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Spectacular Flora and Fauna in Banke National Park

Established in 2010, Banke National Park covers an area of 550 square kilometers, and together with Bardia Park, forms the 1,518 square kilometer area known as the Tiger Conservation Unit Bardia-Banke. Surrounded by a buffer zone stretching into the districts of Banke, Dang and Salyan, most of the Banke National Park lies in the Churia mountain range, providing habitats for a wide range of wildlife and is considered to be vital to the country's goal of doubling its tiger population by 2022.

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Features

Nepal's Tiger Conservation Boosted by Financial Grant

Nepal's commitment to double its numbers of tigers in the wild by 2022 - as agreed to in the Tigers Times Two (TX2) plan devised at the 2010 International Tiger Conservation Forum held in St Petersburg, Russia – has been given a major boost by a $3 million donation from the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. As the Year of the Tiger, according to the traditional Chinese calendar, 2022 was set as a goal for participating countries to show a significant increase in the number of tigers in their protected areas.

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Features

Wetlands of Nepal: Vital for Biodiversity

Supported by 168 contracting parties, including Nepal, the Ramsar Convention is an international treaty promoting the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands around the world. Nepal currently has eight Ramsar sites – Beeshazar Tal, Ghodaghodi Tal, Gokyo Lakes, Gosaikunda, Jagdishpur Reservoir, Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve, Mai Pokhari and Phoksundo Lake – and the Himalayan Nature Conservation and Research Institute, together with the government-funded Conservation and Sustainable Use of Wetlands in Nepal (CSUWN) is involved in overseeing these sites to help them meet the standards and goals of the Ramsar Convention.

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Features

Promoting Bird Conservation in Nepal

As a project of Himalayan Nature, the Kosi Bird Observatory was established north of Nepal's Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve on a vital corridor for migrating birds, to serve as an observatory, research center and field education center. With the support of the Nepal government, the organization has initiated a bird ringing scheme which, it is hoped, will provide bird migration research teams with information regarding migration strategies, life-cycles and populations of birds in this areas. Ringing also provides a unique opportunity to raise public awareness regarding the necessity for conservation.

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Features

Nepal's Giant Flying Squirrels

With their preferred habitat being tall trees in temperate forests, spotted giant flying squirrels (Petaurista elegans) are commonly found at altitudes ranging from 3,000 to 4,000 meters above sea level in Nepal. In springtime they are sometimes observed at lower elevations, presumably due to a lack of food resources at higher elevations as the winter snow melts. These interesting little rodents are found throughout Nepal, as well as in areas to the east and southeast of the country's borders.

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Features

New Currency Features Birthplace of Lord Buddha

Lumbini in Nepal has long been valued by followers as the birthplace of Lord Buddha, with pilgrims traveling from far and wide to pay homage to one of the world's most revered figures. Most scholars agree that Lord Buddha was born in Lumbini in 623 BC, and this fact will soon be displayed on Nepal's new 100-rupee noted which is imprinted with the words "Lumbini: The Birthplace of Lord Buddha". This will no doubt go a long way to correcting misconceptions that Lord Buddha was born in India, although he did give his first sermon and attain enlightenment there, after which he came to be referred to as the "Awakened One" or the "Enlightened One".

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Features

The Himalayan Trust: Legacy of a Legend

When Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay conquered Mount Everest in 1953, the two intrepid adventurers made history and brought the spectacular mountains of Nepal to the attention of the mountaineering community worldwide. Since then dozens of mountaineers have summited Everest, and climbing and trekking bring much-needed revenue to this landlocked mountainous country. Ever mindful of the welfare of others, Sir Edmund Hillary wanted to help the Sherpas living in the remote village of Khumjung and upon enquiring what he could do for them he was told that the children needed a school. This led to fundraising efforts and the building of the first school in Khumjung in 1961. It also led to the founding of the Himalayan Trust, through which communities continue to be assisted. Sir Edmund's son, Peter, devotes much of his time to supporting the trust his father established.

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Features

Tiger Conservation in Nepal

A joint survey carried out by Nepal and India over a 600-mile area has revealed that the number of Bengal tigers has increased to 198 since the last survey was carried out in 2009. Bengal tigers (Pantheras tigris tigris) are found in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Bhutan, China and Burma, and there are thought to be fewer than 2,500 left in the wild in all these countries collectively. The increase has been hailed as a milestone in Nepal's commitment to double the numbers of tigers in the wild by 2022 as agreed to in the "TX2" (Tigers Times Two) plan at the International Tiger Conservation Forum held in 2010 in St Petersburg, Russia.

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