Evasive mission for justice

evasive-mission-for-justice

Published at: November 25, 2020 Updated at: November 26, 2020 00: 04 Fourteen years is a very long time in politics. Nepal has seen transformation in its political landscape in the past 14 years after the Maoist contenders safe-landed in traditional politics, and raised the drapes on what would be called a brand-new period. The […]

Published at: November 25, 2020

Updated at: November 26, 2020 00: 04

Fourteen years is a very long time in politics. Nepal has seen transformation in its political landscape in the past 14 years after the Maoist contenders safe-landed in traditional politics, and raised the drapes on what would be called a brand-new period. The Comprehensive Peace Arrangement signed by the Maoists and the then federal government visualized integrating the former contenders in the forces and fixing up those who could not be integrated; socio-political improvement of the nation; and justice for the victims of cases of gross human rights infraction. While the combination of the combatants has actually taken shape, and the improvement of the country materialised to some degree, the concept of justice has actually never truly taken centre phase as of now.

Political parties may wish to provide a spin that the transitional period has ended with the holding of the Constituent Assembly elections, or preparing the constitution, and even holding elections to a federal structure. However, the transitional justice process is not yet over. And, going by the goings-on in the twin commissions established to take the transitional justice procedure to a logical end– the Reality and Reconciliation Commission and the Commission of Investigation on Imposed Disappeared Individuals– there are a lot of obstructions on the road to justice today.

Based on their current reports, the truth commission has 63,718 cases and the disappearance commission has 2,506 cases to look into. 5 years after they came into existence, the twin commissions are yet to examine a single case. What’s more, the commissioners are reportedly lobbying for an extension of their terms by four years saying it would take that long to finish the investigations. And this is what human rights activists, civil society members and families of victims feared right from the beginning. The commissions have as soon as again shown what they have developed into: Organizations that are not interested in providing justice to the households of the victims, however in dilly-dallying to the level of making the concept of justice outdated entirely.

Helping the commissions in their inefficacy are the political parties that end up being bros in arms when it comes to protecting each other’s criminal activities and dismissing the intent of the transitional justice procedure. Clearly, the political parties appear to think that the victims’ families will get tired enough of looking for justice to leave the demand entirely. Open wounds can not be left unattended, for they may get even worse in course of time. The only escape is to heal the wounds through the right method. A stitch in time saves nine. Nepal has consistently committed before the international neighborhood and at the UN online forum about concluding the procedure, but it has actually failed to maintain its dedication. Furthermore, Nepal’s presence at the UN Person Rights Commission could be doubtful if it continues to stop working in providing justice to the victims of human rights abuse.

There is no doubt among Nepalis, and especially the households of the victims, that the revolt was an extraordinary circumstance; which the normative ideas of the criminal justice system do not apply as they are in insurgency-era cases. If the ideal method towards finding the reality about killings, maiming and disappearances during the war age is to be taken, there is definitely wish for reconciliation or forgiveness and a way out for a shared future. Transitional justice, therefore, is not an other-worldly idea completely. What it simply requires is a company commitment from all stakeholders to see it through. Such a dedication is sorely missing out on amongst a number of the stakeholders in the transitional justice process.


.