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Mountains

Manaslu in Nepal, Mountains, Travel Destinations

The Manaslu Mountain is the highest in the Manaslu region, and stands at a height of 8 156 meters. Even though this mountain in Nepal was first challenged in 1952, the summit was only reached in the year 1956. Manaslu opened for climbers in 1991, but they are still required to obtain permits to enter this area. The very first trekkers in the area were part of an expedition led by H.W. Tilman in 1950.

Trekkers and climbers need extensive experience before taking to the
slopes of Manaslu. It is a mountain in Nepal that is known to be
dangerous,
and due to its remote and secluded location, rescue operations are
hampered
should anything go wrong. But, even so, it is a mountain that never
ceases
to amaze and captivate that adventurous spirits that flock here. Which
is
fitting for Manaslu, as it is the 8th highest mountain in the world,
and its
name means “Spirit Mountain”. Not only are the views breathtaking, the
area
is culturally rich as there are small groups of locals that live in
the
Nupri Valley and Buri Gandaki Valley.

The summit of Manaslu can be reached by various routes, of which the
South Face is viewed as the most dangerous and difficult to overcome.
Most
of the treks to Manaslu start in Gokyo and over the Larkya La Pass. The
recommended months for climbing Manaslu Mountain is during February,
March,
April, May, June and September to December. During the months of
February to
June, the days are warm and the forests and landscape can be view
perfectly
in the crisp and clear mornings. In June, the mountain is almost
deserted,
and climbers can enjoy their time in seclusion and tranquility. From
September to December the days are almost always sunny, but the
evenings can
get extremely cold.

The beauty and magnificence of the Manaslu Mountain and surrounding
area
was hidden from the world for many years, due to the restrictions on
this
region. Even though foreigners are now allowed to venture into this
area,
with a permit, many people are still unaware of this natural treasure
and
the splendor of its landscape.